There are literally thousands of social media analytics tools out there. When you get accustomed to one tool sometimes you might get the feeling that you are missing out on something and that other analytics tool can offer incredible, flashy and (apparently) indispendible features that would ease your work or provide you with some data which will help the enrichment of your social media reports.

This is something I always try to stress as a social media analysts: the fact that other tools may offer “more”, doesn’t mean that other tools can offer what you actually need.

There are 1000s of tools out there offering more or less the same data, stats etc… and that try to differentiate themselves by adding some (sometimes insignificant) features.

The question you should ask yourself is “what data do I need in order to produce a good report about my social media activity, campaign or project?”

Secondly, you should investigate which tools provide this data.

Thirdly, among the tools you have identified, you can choose the one you think is the most user-friendly.

If you do the opposite (checking what features a set of tools can offer and then go for the most “complete one”) your quest will be biased by some “needs” you possibly don’t have while analysing your social media activity.

Don’t get me wrong, experimenting doesn’t hurt. So, I do encourage you to try different tools (if time permits). But when making your final choice, I would recommend sticking to the points above.

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