marcoRecorder

Disruptiveness matters

It’s been a few months that I’m submerged by spam mail from Linkedin. This increased especially after trying their upgrade and then unsubscribing. When I first signed up for LinkedIn , I did so with the understanding that it would connect me with others sharing similar interests, networks and keep in touch with professionals I meet. Partly, this platform did deliver what I expected.  I have now a good LinkedIn network and it certainly facilitates solidifying contacts after meetings and keep track of what others are doing and how others’ careers are developing.

Even though I like the tool, their spamming marketing is becoming too annoying. Besides, their option to unsubscribe it is all to no effect.

If you have no interest or connection to Linkedin then the simplest thing to do is create a Rule in your email program, or set your Spam filter to automatically delete any emails with the word Linkedin in the message body. You can report both real and fake Linkedin messages by forwarding all details to abuse@linkedin.com. If you are an active Linkedin member then all you can do is remain vigilant, ignore emails from members you do no know or trust, never click on any links and use your web browser to visit the Linkedin.com site to check your messages and contacts.

Another thing I find highly controversial is about contacting someone who isn’t a “first degree” contact. You have to pay LinkedIn to send an “InMail.” Presumably, the reason you can’t email them to begin with is to protect the person’s privacy – which obviously is a lower priority than LinkedIn making some money. Want to see who’s viewed your profile?  Then pay for LinkedIn Premium. This feature is actually (partially) available to “non premium” users as well, but “premium” allows you to see a detailed history instead of  just a recent few.

LinkedIn

Another bad feature I notice is actually quite big. You get an email (in your gmail inbox) and click to type out your lengthy reply (you are taken to LinkedIn’s website). You click “send” and move on with your life… but wait, the email didn’t send –  you are taken to a login screen… I hope you didn’t walk away from your computer for a moment (or move onto another project) because if you wait a couple minutes to login then your message is gone.

Why do they include this “security feature?” I clicked reply from the message that LinkedIn sent to my personal email, then it took me to a screen where I appear to be logged in (and can see the identity of the person I am responding to. I appear to be logged in at this point (and if someone is hacking my email, they already have violated my privacy at this point).

However, LinkedIn has over 200 million users, so it’s better to be in than out. If you liked what I write (or even if you don’t) you can connect with me on my LinkedIn profile.

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