One of my favourite discussions brought up by the famous communication expert Mike Elgan is about using Google Plus as a pure blogging platform. Defining true blogging gets harder and harder simply because the 4 most used social media represent an example of blogging too.

Demian Farnworth from Copyblogger explains his disagreement with Elgan in this blogpost.

I like Elgan’s reply. It’s experimental, it’s innovative, it’s trendy. However, I believe Farnworth argument is more solid and more applicable across different types of business. Even though defining “blogging” gets harder and harder it is true that a sort of implicit and commonly shared definition exists among communication experts.

See below Elgan’s reply to Farnworth. Do you agree?

Point 1. You become a digital sharecropper.

Counterpoint: Google+ is more viral, gives you a vastly larger audience and a more engaged community around your blog than you can get on any other site. (What bloggers should really fear is needless obscurity.)

Point 2. You can’t (easily) monetize a social media blog.

Counterpoint: Google+ is more viral, gives you a vastly larger audience and a more engaged community around your blog than you can get on any other site. (You also can’t monetize a blog with no readers.)

Point 3. No effective archive.

Counterpoint: Google+ is more viral, gives you a vastly larger audience and a more engaged community around your blog than you can get on any other site. (Nobody wants to read old posts on most blogs and, if they do on Google+, the search feature and auto-hashtags are better than an archive.)

Point 4. Clunky link structure.

Counterpoint: Google+ is more viral, gives you a vastly larger audience and a more engaged community around your blog than you can get on any other site. (There are benefits, too. Namely, by exposing the links readers are less likely to be tricked into opening a malware page.)

Point 5. No schedule posting feature.

Counterpoint: Google+ is more viral, gives you a vastly larger audience and a more engaged community around your blog than you can get on any other site. (Plus you can use Do Share to schedule posts.)

Point 6. No control over design.

Counterpoint: Google+ is more viral, gives you a vastly larger audience and a more engaged community around your blog than you can get on any other site. (It’s fun to play publisher on a blogging site with custom design, but it’s better for readers to have a unified design, as on Google+.)

Point 7. Plantation owners change, wither, and die.

Counterpoint: Google+ is more viral, gives you a vastly larger audience and a more engaged community around your blog than you can get on any other site. (In the extremely unlikely event that Google would close G+, the loyal readership you would have gained would be movable to the new site. Bloggers move their blogs all the time — usually because the site sucks and not because the company shuts it down.)

Point 8. Google doesn’t think it’s a great idea, either.

Counterpoint: Google+ is more viral, gives you a vastly larger audience and a more engaged community around your blog than you can get on any other site. (You blog for you, not Google.)

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